Kroger Being Sued For Religious Discrimination After Firing Two Employees

CONWAY, Ark. — The Kroger in Conway, Ark. violated a federal law when it fired two employees who asked for a religious accommodation to avoid wearing an emblem they believed contradicted their religious beliefs. 

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) charged this violation in a lawsuit, filed on Monday, Sept. 14.

According to the EEOC’s suit, the Conway Kroger implemented a new dress code, which included an apron depicting a rainbow-colored heart emblem on the bib of the apron. 

The women believed the emblem endorsed LGBTQ values and that wearing it would violate their religious beliefs. According to the EEOC, one woman offered to wear the apron with the emblem covered and the other offered to wear a different apron without the emblem, but the company made no attempt to accommodate their requests. 

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Ex-Angels Employee Fired After Claiming He Was a “Public Scapegoat”

Former Angels employee Brian Harkins, fired March 3 for allegedly providing illegal ball-doctoring substances to visiting pitchers, has filed a complaint against the team and Major League Baseball claiming he was made a “public scapegoat” in baseball’s efforts to crack down on the use of foreign substances.

The complaint, first reported by ESPN early Sunday morning, was filed in Orange County Superior Court on Aug. 28. The lawsuit names the Angels and the MLB and cites defamation, as well as labor code violations.

Harkins, nicknamed “Bubba,” spent almost four decades with the Angels, starting as a batboy in 1981. He was the visiting clubhouse attendant when he was dismissed after an MLB investigation that said he was providing a blend of sticky substances — known as “Go-Go Juice” — to visiting pitchers to aid their grip of the baseball.

Read the source article at latimes.com

Black Employees Sues Mitsubishi Electric US for Racial Harassment

Dive Brief:

  • Four Black construction workers in the escalator and elevator division of Mitsubishi Electric US are suing the company in California Superior Court for allegedly allowing their supervisors to harass them with racial slurs and images and discriminate against them when it came to opportunities for training, higher pay, overtime and advancement in their careers.
  • The four men claim that in addition to the race-based harassment and discrimination they endured on jobsites in the San Francisco Bay Area, complaints made to Mitsubishi’s human resources department beginning in 2016 went largely unaddressed for years. When a few of the employees committing the acts were finally disciplined, the plaintiffs allege, the company did nothing about ongoing similar behavior, and inaction on the part of Mitsubishi fed a hostile work environment, they said.
Read the source article at Construction News and Trends

Former Employee Sues IBM Over Alleged Age Discrimination

A former IBM employee has filed a lawsuit accusing the company of age discrimination following the elimination of her position when she was 63 years old.

In a complaint filed on Sept. 1 in the U.S. District Court for the District of Connecticut, Brenda VanDeWeghe stated she began working for IBM’s Global Business Services unit as a recruiter in February 2010 in the capacity of an independent contractor, joining the Armonk-based company as a “long-term supplemental employee” in March 2011 and a full-time employee in May 2014. In June 2015, she was promoted to North American Executive Referral Program Manager.

VanDeWeghe’s lawsuit noted that IBM began making a companywide emphasis on the value of workforce millennials in a 2014 conference titled “Reinvention in the Age of the Millennial,” which resulted in an “early professional” hiring program targeted solely at young professionals.

Read the source article at westfaironline.com

Former PAWS Employee Files Lawsuit Alleging Financial Mismanagement and Harassment

FORT WALTON BEACH — A lawsuit filed by an ex-employee accuses both the Panhandle Animal Welfare Board of Directors and former Executive Director Dee Thompson of mishandling finances. 

Manda Moore, who served as community development coordinator for the county’s animal services provider until September of 2019, claims she was fired when she came forward as a whistle blower to speak out against fiscal mismanagement.

“Ms. Moore voiced objections to activities she believed to be violations of the law, rule or regulation,” the lawsuit, filed Aug. 21, states. It claims Thompson, who resigned unexpectedly in February for “personal reasons,” misused and misapplied PAWS money and made false statements in order to obtain or retain grant money.

Read the source article at Northwest Florida Daily News

McDonalds Ex-Franchise Owners are Suing for $1B After Discrimination Claims

TOPLINE

 McDonald’s is being sued for up to $1 billion by dozens of Black former franchise owners who claim that the fast food giant systematically placed them in “substandard locations” that hinder profitability and growth, saddling them with high insurance costs and leaving their restaurants performing below the national norm, according to the plaintiffs.

KEY FACTS

The lawsuit comes weeks after the world’s biggest fast food chain was among dozens of corporations to release a statement in support of Black Lives Matter and condemn racism following George Floyd’s death and nationwide anti-racism protests.

Read the source article at forbes.com

Tomukun Ex-Empolyee Files Suit Against Restaurant for Wrongful Termination Claims

Nicholas Prada, a former employee at Tomukun Noodle Bar on East Liberty Street, filed a suit in a U.S. district court Friday claiming he was wrongfully terminated after contracting COVID-19 in late June. According to the lawsuit, Prada and his attorney, Noah Hurwitz, allege that Tomukun’s actions violate numerous federal acts, including the Families First Coronavirus Response Act and Family Medical Leave Act.

In an email to The Daily, Hurwitz said employers should not retaliate against employees in order to protect their public image. Instead, they should act with compassion and understanding for employees who may get sick, Hurwitz said.

“It appears that Tomukun lost sight of its legal obligations to employees and punished my client for contracting COVID-19 when it wouldn’t put him back on the schedule after he recovered,” Hurwitz wrote. “While we are all tasked with being responsible and doing our best to avoid spread of the virus, businesses should not attempt to pass judgment on employees who fall ill.” 

Read the source article at The Michigan Daily

Black Employee Sues University After Staffer Pretended to Lynch Him

KALAMAZOO, MI — A Black staff member is suing Western Michigan University alleging a white coworker tied a noose and mocked lynching him at a diversity and inclusion meeting.

The federal lawsuit was filed on Monday, Aug. 24 at the United States District Court for the Western District of Michigan.

Smith Moore, a Black man, claims that Mitchell Beare, a white man, came up behind him at a diversity and inclusion meeting and looped a rope in the shape of a noose behind him. Moore turned around and saw that Beare was moving to put the loop around his neck when other coworkers shouted at Beare to stop.

Read the source article at mlive.com

Ex-TMZ Employee Sues Over Gender Discrimination and Retaliation After Reporting

A former TMZ employee filed a lawsuit against the celebrity gossip show’s parent companies Warner Bros. Entertainment and EHM Productions on Tuesday alleging gender discrimination and retaliation.

Bernadette Zilio, 27, worked at TMZ and TooFab, another entertainment site owned by Warner Bros. and EHM Productions, from 2015 to 2020 and said she was fired after she complained to HR about a culture of toxicity and sexism. TMZ founder Harvey Levin, TooFab Managing Editor Shyam Dodge, and TooFab Senior Producer Ross McDonagh are also named in the lawsuit.

In the complaint, which was filed Tuesday with the US Equal Employment Opportunity Commission and the California Department of Fair Employment and Housing, Zilio said she went to Warner Bros. HR representatives in April 2019 about issues of “sexism, belittlement, preferential treatment and lies running rampant on [her] team.” She told HR that she felt there was a division of how men and women were treated on her team, and that when she spoke up about McDonagh writing articles she considered sexist and offensive, such as one that compared Rihanna getting sick with bronchitis and the “attack on her lungs” to her being attacked by Chris Brown, her concerns about making light of domestic violence were dismissed.

Read the source article at BuzzFeed News

US Lawyers Association Files Lawsuit on Hiking Non-Immigration Visa Fee

The American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA) and Sidley Austin law firm have jointly filed a lawsuit seeking “immediate injunction” of the rule hiking the US’ non-immigration visa fee.

The fee hike is set to be implemented from October 2, 2020.

The lawsuit has been filed against Chad Wolf, Kenneth Cuccinelli, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), The Economic Times reported.
 Jesse Bless, director of litigation at AILA told the paper, the “dramatic” fee increase would “immediately devastate vulnerable populations and our organisational plaintiffs who serve them”.
Read the source article at moneycontrol.com